The goal of SfAA News is to be a rich and vibrant record of the activities of the Society and its members.  Content includes standard fare, such as reports and updates from the Board, committees, and topical interest groups, but also other content that highlights the special nature of the Society and anthropology more broadly.  For example, interviews with important and influential social scientists, activists, and community leaders reports from our members "in the field," and stories of public engagement are all important regular contributions.  We are always open to new content and welcome suggestions for improving the coverage, reach, and visibility of SfAA News.

2019

Volume 30, Issue #1 - February

Volume 30, Issue #2 -  May

Volume 30, Issue #3 -  August

Volume 30, Issue #4 -  November

Newsletter Archive

2018

Volume 29 #1 - February 2018

Volume 29 #2 - May 2018

Volume 29 #3 - August 2018

Volume 29 #4 - November 2018

2017

Volume 28 #1 - February 2017

Volume 28 #2 - May 2017

Volume 28 #3 - August 2017

Volume 28 - November 2017

2016

Volume 27 #2 - June 2016

Volume 27 #3 - August 2016

Volume 27 #4 - November 2016

2015

Volume 26 #1 - February 2015

Volume 26 #2 - June 2015

Volume 26 #3 - August 2015

Volume 26 #4 - December 2015





2014

Volume 25 #1 - February 2014

Volume 25 #2 - June 2014

Volume 25 #3 - October 2014

2013

Volume 24 #1 - February 2013

Volume 24 #2 - May 2013

Volume 24 #3 - August 2013

Volume 24 #4 - November 2013

2012

Volume 23 #1 - February 2012

Volume 23 #2 - May 2012

Volume 23 #3 - August 2012

Volume 23 #4 - November 2012

2011

Volume 22 #1 - February 2011

Volume 22 #2 - May 2011

Volume 22 #3 - August 2011

Volume 22 #4 - November 2011


2010

Volume 21 #1 - February 2010

Volume 21 #2 - May 2010

Volume 21 #3 - August 2010

Volume 21 #4 - November 2010


2006

Volume 17 #1 - February 2006

Volume 17 #2 - May 2006

Volume 17 #3 - August 2006

Volume 17 #4 - November 2006


2002

Volume 13 #1 - February 2002

Volume 13 #2 - May 2002

Volume 13 #3 - August 2002

Volume 13 #4 - November 2002


1998

Volume 8 #2 - May 1998

Volume 8 #4 - November 1998

 

 


1992

Volume 3 #1 - February 1992

 

 

 


2009

Volume 20 #1 - February 2009

Volume 20 #2 - May 2009

Volume 20 #3 - August 2009

Volume 20 #4 - November 2009


2005

Volume 16 #1 - February 2005

Volume 16 #2 - May 2005

Volume 16 #3 - August 2005

Volume 16 #4 - November 2005


2001

Volume 12 #1 - February 2001

Volume 12 #2 - May 2001

Volume 12 #3 - August 2001

Volume 12 #4 - November 2001


1996

Volume 6 #4 - November 1996

 

 

 


2008

Volume 19 ​​​​​#1 - February 2008

Volume 19 #2 - May 2008

Volume 19 #3 - August 2008

Volume 19 ​​​​​​​​#4 - November 2008


2004

Volume 15 #1 - February 2004

Volume 15 #2 - May 2004

Volume 15 #3 - August 2004

Volume 15 #4 - November 2004


2000

Volume 11 #1 - February 2000

Volume 11 #2 - May 2000

Volume 11 #3 - August 2000

Volume 11 #4 - November 2000


1995

Volume 6 #1 - February 1995

Volume 6 #3 - August 1995

 

 


2007

Volume 18 #1 - February 2007

Volume 18 #2 - May 2007

Volume 18 #3 - August 2007

Volume 18 #4 - November 2007


2003

Volume 14 #1 - February 2003

Volume 14 #2 - May 2003

Volume 14 #3 - August 2003

Volume 14 #4 - November 2003


1999

Volume 10 #1 - February 1999

Volume 10 #2 - May 1999

Volume 10 #3 - August 1999

Volume 10 #4 - November 1999


1993

Volume 4 #4 - November 1993

 

 

 

Editors

About the Editors

Simonelli.pngJeanne Simonelli is an applied cultural anthropologist and writer who taught for 26 years at SUNY-Oneonta and Wake Forest University. Like Sherlock Holmes, she is author of a huge number of infinitely boring but scientifically significant monographs. She has published five books with good titles including Uprising of Hope: Sharing the Zapatista Journey to Autonomous Development  (Alta Mira, 2005); Crossing Between Worlds: The Navajo of Canyon de Chelly  (Waveland, 2008; SAR, 1997); Too Wet To Plow: The Family Farm in Transition (New Amsterdam, 1992) and Two Boys, A Girl, and Enough! (Westview, 1986). She has spent summers wearing a Smoky-the-Bear hat as an interpretive Park Ranger, doing development projects with a rebel organization in southern Mexico and fighting the good fight against gas and oil extraction, especially in New York.. She was co-editor of Practicing Anthropology and Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment (CAFÉ) and is pleased to return to editing with the SfAA News.  Her goal in life is to have a novel featured  in the Albuquerque Airport bookstore.

Tamir.pngOrit Tamir (Ph.D. 1993, Arizona State University) is a social-cultural anthropologist who specializes in the cultures of Southwest Native Americans.  Early in her career, Orit focused on the socioeconomic response variations of Dinè (Navajo) to forced relocation from Hopi Partition Land.  Orit worked as a full-time Cultural Resource Management (CRM) ethnographer/ethnologist in both public and private sectors before joining the faculty of New Mexico Highlands University (NMHU).  While at NMHU she has taught a broad range of anthropology courses and spearheaded the successful development and launch of a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program in CRM.  She is currently working on converting the latter to a Professional Online MA in CRM.  Orit has been active in the Society for Applied Anthropology (Program Chair of the 2006 and the 2015 75thAnniversary Meeting, and member of the Executive Committee of the 2017 meetings) and is affiliated with the Anthropology of Higher Education TIG.  She also continues to regularly participate in Navajo Studies conferences.  Orit is a full Professor of Anthropology at New Mexico Highlands University’s Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice.  Her publications include a book From Classic to Contemporary: Readings in Applied Sociocultural Anthropology, articles on the Navajo-Hopi Land Dispute and on the spread of the Sun Dance movement to the Navajo reservation, publications on the anthropology of higher education, and numerous CRM and other project reports.  Orit lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico and loves the outdoors.

Contact Us

Items to be included in SfAA News should be sent to Orit Tamir (otamir@nmhu.edu).  The contributor's preferred email address should be included, along with the professional affiliations of all authors or others mentioned in the copy.  Also, headshots of authors and other photos relevant to the submission, along with captions if needed or desired, can be submitted.

Announcements

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is pleased to announce an opportunity for graduate students in the social and natural sciences to apply for a two-year Margaret A. Davidson Graduate Fellowship to tackle complex challenges in the nation’s estuaries and coastal communities. The Fellow will work with one of the nation’s 29 National Estuarine Research Reserves alongside a mentor, fellow scientists from diverse fields, and local community leaders and decision makers as the team addresses coastal challenges. The Davidson Fellowship includes networking opportunities and career-readiness training.
 
An example of a critical research need is at the intersection of climate change and human health and wellbeing. Western Lake Superior is experiencing more precipitation, warmer winters and increasing storm events and these environmental changes impact human health and well-being in complex ways. Community leaders need to understand climate impacts to human health at the local level in order to prepare their communities for future conditions. We seek a graduate student in applied social sciences to help us develop and implement a comprehensive assessment of the risks and severity of climate change health impacts in western Lake Superior coastal communities.

Margaret Davidson Fellowship

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©Society for Applied Anthropology 

P.O. Box 2436 • Oklahoma City, OK 73101 • 405.843.5113 • info@appliedanthro.org