2019 Podcasts

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Podcasts were recorded in Portland, OR, USA at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology in March 2019.

  1. Doing Applied Urban Ethnography in the Neoliberal Age
  2. Environmental Justice Ethnography in the Classroom: Teaching Activism, Inspiring Involvement
  3. Increasing the Impact of Anthropologists Beyond the Academy
  4. Advocacy, Public Engagement and Member Service: An SfAA/AAA Roundtable
  5. Paredes Memorial Plenary
  6. Community Resilience in the Face of Natural and Manmade Disasters: Stories from the Field and the Role of Social Scientists
  7. Issues for Refugees Resettling in the US
  8. Moving Beyond #MeToo Commentary: How Applied Anthropologists Can Implement Lasting Change
  9. Kearny Memorial Lecture
  10. Anthropology AND Activism
  11. Applying Anthropology in Education: Addressing Equity from K-College
  12. Applied Visual Anthropology
  13. Human Trafficking: Critical Perspectives on U.S. Policy, Practice, and Discourse
  14. Inclusion on Campus: the Role of Anthropology
  15. Engaging the Traditional Practice of Navajo Peacemaking into Present-day Education to Address the Historical Turbulence of Colonization
  16. SfAA Awards Ceremony
  17. Indigenous Voices in Parks and Protected Areas: Applied Ethnography from the American Southwest to Central Australia
  18. Re-Thinking Subsistence in Turbulent Times: New Contexts, Configurations, and Intersections with Social and Environmental Justice
  19. Designs for Applied Anthropology
  20. Designs for Teaching Other Worlds

2019 Podcast Team

Kenneth Saintonge, Chair
Christina Wasson, UNT Advisor
Beth Holland, Communications
Claire Deahl, Interactive Media
Gigi Taylor, Social Media
Sarah Stutts, Communitcatio
Shannon Cronin, Interactive Media
Randy Sparrazza, Audio
David Werner, Audio

Volunteers

Caitlin Griffith
Tabia Schmidt
Guin Wright

1

Doing Applied Urban Ethnography in the Neoliberal Age

CHAIR: NELSON, Andrew (UNT)

ABSTRACT: As cities become increasingly deregulated and privatized, applied urban ethnographers encounter new approaches to community empowerment. In this panel, we present four different ethnographic examples of organizations and people employing tactics and strategies for meeting social needs in the neoliberal city. For instance, we highlight urban farms appealing to city-dwellers’ desire for ‘working the land,’ a museum organizing social science exhibits and talks, a community center developing programs for a historically neglected African-American neighborhood, and a transgender affirming initiative compensating for the uneven distribution of LGBTQ-oriented health services in the city.

Session participants:

MCFARLAND, Kelly (UNT) Urban Farming: Secret Gardens, Hidden Jungles, and Unexpected Farms in Plain Sight

SANCHEZ, Saniego (UNT) Art Exhibitions and Programs as Vital Resources for Urban Applied Ethnographers

BELL, Kayeron (K.D.) (UNT) Evaluating Neighborhood Needs for Social Programs

JIMENEZ, Kat (UNT) (Trans)cending Dallas’ “Gayborhood”: Establishing the Need for LGBTQ Urban Mobility

DISCUSSANT: NELSON, Andrew (UNT), Speaker: SANCHEZ, Saniego (UNT)

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

2

Environmental Justice Ethnography in the Classroom: Teaching Activism, Inspiring Involvement

CHAIR: ALEXANDER, William

ABSTRACT: Ethnographic research on ways people organize and take action to protect their families and communities from exposure to toxins while demanding accountability is a significant topic in applied anthropology. When students encounter this through curriculum they come to understand policies and factors that place communities at risk and appreciate the role of activist ethnography in documenting inequities and promoting change. In this session, anthropologists share experiences teaching ethnography courses on environmental justice issues. Panelists discuss course design, ethnographic literature, pedagogy, and class projects in which students apply what they learn to participation in environmental justice movements in their own communities.

Session participants:

SHERWOOD, Yvonne (UCSC) When We Follow: Social Movement Camps as Learning Places

DAVIS, Brittany (Regis U) Critical Self-Reflection and Personal Transformation in the EJ Classroom

WELLS, E. Christian (USF) Cultivating a Critical Environmental Justice Perspective among Students through University Community Engaged Research in Tampa Bay, Florida

LINCOLN, Martha (SFSU) Teaching Environmental Justice in the Field

ALEXANDER, William (UNCW) The Classroom After the Disaster: Hurricane Florence and Environmental Justice Ethnography in Coastal North Carolina

DISCUSSANT: LITTLE, Peter C. (RIC)

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

3

Increasing the Impact of Anthropologists Beyond the Academy

CHAIR: GRUß, Inga (Kaiser Permanente)

ABSTRACT: Despite the widespread application of ethnographic methods and anthropological language by other fields and in popular language, the task of translating anthropological skills and the depth of knowledge gained through academic training remains a challenge. Learning how anthropologists can most effectively communicate and demonstrate the ways in which the discipline can have meaningful impact remains an ongoing task. This panel features anthropologists working in healthcare, business, and industry who have overcome challenges in their work to ultimately show the deeper impact that anthropological approaches and perspectives can create across a variety of applied settings.

Session participants:

BERNIUS, Matthew (Measures for Justice) Implications beyond Design: Practicing Anthropology in the Age of Ethnography

GRUß, Inga (Kaiser Permanente) The Pragmatic Practitioner: Advancing Qualitative Methods in Health Services Research

PITCHON, Ana (Insitum) Language Matters: Town Halls, Policy and Peer Review; HASBROUCK, Jay (Filament Insight & Innovation) Getting Ahead of Appropriation: Ethnographic Thinking and FullSpectrum Insight

SCULL, Charley (Filament Insight & Innovation) We Don’t Say Weird in Anthropology: The Intrinsic Value of Anthropology for Multidisciplinary Teams

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

4

Advocacy, Public Engagement and Member Service: An SfAA/AAA Roundtable

ORGANIZERS: BRILLER, Sherylyn (Purdue U) and BARKER, Alex (U Missouri)
MODERATOR: ALVAREZ, Roberto (UCSD)

ABSTRACT: The SfAA and AAA have had a long and somewhat uneven history of collaboration, but there has never been a more important time for our discipline, and the time for rapprochement is now. Together, we draw on our collective power to amplify the voices of our members to highlight important anthropological contributions to build a more just and sustainable world. Leaders from the two groups will share perspectives on a selected set of timely issues, and where we can make a genuine impact on behalf of our members and the field by working together.

Roundtable participants:

BRILLER, Sherylyn (Purdue U)
BARKER, Alex (U Missouri)
GUERRON MONTERO, Carla (UDel)
WIES, Jennifer (Ball State U)
QUINN, Hannah (U Toronto)
JOHNSTON, Barbara Rose (Ctr for Political Ecology) 

Parts 1-4

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

5

J. Anthony Memorial Plenary

The plenary is sponsored by the SfAA J. Anthony Paredes Memorial Committee

Honoring Native American Heritage through Collaborative Design

Native American leaders strive to balance traditional heritage with contemporary cultural influences, while anticipating future impacts on traditional culture. In order to collaboratively design Tribal facilities, design professionals must seek to understand Tribal values and economic pressures from the point of view of Tribal people. Making a conscious effort to honor the unique aspects of each Tribal group helps achieve the balance between traditional and contemporary. This presentation discusses how cultural influences can inform meaningful design solutions that honor heritage and environment, along with contemporary values.

CHAIRS: GARCE , David (GSBS Architects) and PARRY, Darren (Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Indian Nation)

PANELISTS: 

GARCE, David (GSBS Architects)

PARRY, Darren (Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Indian Nation)

GROSS, Michael (Councilman, Northwestern Band of the Shoshone Indian Nation)

BOEKA CANNON, Molly (Executive Director, Utah State U Museum of Anthropology)

CANNON, Kenneth (President/Owner, Cannon Heritage Consultants Inc)

Q&A

6

Community Resilience in the Face of Natural and Manmade Disasters: Stories from the Field and the Role of Social Scientists

CHAIRS: WILLIS, David Blake, LONG, Tracy, STREET, Colette, and MURPHY, Dawn (Fielding Grad U)

ABSTRACT: The increasing number and intensity of natural and manmade disasters have created challenges to the sustainability of local communities across the globe. The record number of climate disasters recently, as well as critical manmade disasters in communities far and wide, have resulted in widespread tragedy, but these events have also produced substantial learning opportunities and the emergence of positive community adaptations. This collection of papers and reflections examines recent stories of community resilience in the face of devastating climate and manmade events and questions the role of social scientists in understanding recovery experiences and developing adaptation strategies for the future.

Session participants:

LONG, Tracy (Fielding Grad U) Out of the Ashes: Community Resiliency in the Aftermath of Natural Disaster

WILLIS, David Blake (Fielding Grad U) The Worker’s Home: Gandhians Leading the Way in Grass-Roots Organizing

MURPHY, Dawn (Fielding Grad U) and EIBEN, Vicky (Viterbo U) “All People and Generations Welcome”: Folk Schools and the Discovery of Community in Turbulent Yet Hopeful Times

STREET, Colette (Fielding Grad U) Embodying Emotion and Change through Plutchick’s Circumplex Model and Greco Roman Myth

DISCUSSANT: HO, Christine (Fielding Grad U)

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

7

Issues for Refugees Resettling in the US

CHAIR: BAER, Roberta (USF)

ABSTRACT: This is part 1 of a 2-part session that addresses the issues faced by refugees currently resettling in the US. Topics addressed include portrayals of refugees by the media, community building, challenges for youth, family-related anxiety, access to health care, understandings of cancer care and screening, and dietary adaptation. Authors are all engaged in applied work with diverse refugee communities across the US.

Session participants:

INKS, Michaela (USF) Refugee Agency in Mass Media

BEHRMAN, Carolyn (U Akron) Intentional Community-Building and Adaptive Practices among US-Based Karen Refugees from BurmaMAHONEY, Dillon (USF) Collaborative Video Production, Social Media, and the Challenges Facing Refugee Youth

WATSON, Marnie (MO State U) ‘They don’t love me anymore’: Causes and Effects of Family-Related Anxiety among the Nepali-Bhutanese Community in NE Ohio

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

8

Moving Beyond #MeToo Commentary: How Applied Anthropologists Can Implement Lasting Change

CHAIR: TAYLOR, Melina (USF)

ABSTRACT: The last year has seen an explosion of the #MeToo Movement, both in the mainstream and in academia. With high profile sexual assault cases being brought against Harvey Weinstein, Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, and Les Moonves in the entertainment industry; the movement quickly spread to academia, prompting the hashtag #MeTooPhD (Kelsky 2018), a sexual misconduct case spreadsheet through Michigan State University (Libarkin 2018), and the Avital Ronell case. Themes of power, political hierarchy, institutional violence, and white feminism (to name a few) have provided analysis to the movement. Special issues and articles (Berry et al 2017, AFA Voices Spring 2018), podcasts and blog posts (Enrici and Tusing 2018), an interest group (#MeTooAnthro.org), and AAA statement (AAA 2018) in Anthropology have weighed in on this important issue.

Session participants:

IRELAND, Morgan (Syracuse U) #MeToo and Developing an Anti-Racist, Anti-Capitalist Lens for Sexual Violence in Activist-Scholarship

TAYLOR, Melina (USF) Reworking the Academy: Issues, Considerations, and Providing Support to Address Sexual Assault/Harassment in the #MeToo Era

BACKE, Emma (George Washington U) Anthropological Allyship and Ethnographic Care: Bringing #MeToo to Bear in the Field and Academy

HALL-CLIFFORD, Rachel (Agnes Scott Coll) Where There Is No Hashtag: Global Health Confronts #MeToo

DISCUSSANT: LAMPHERE, Louise

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

9

Kearney Memorial Lecture

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: MOSES, Yolanda (UCR)
COMMENTATORS: HARRISON, Faye V. (U Illinois), THOMAS, Deborah A. (U Penn)

ABSTRACT: What the AAA Race Exhibit Is Telling Us about Race and Identity in the Twenty-first Century?
In January of 2007 the exhibit, “Race: are we so different?,” which explores race through the lenses of science, history and lived experience opened at the Science Museum of Minnesota and St Paul in six degree below zero weather. In spite of the weather, it was the largest opening attendance of any exhibit ever. We knew right away that we had tapped into a deep emotional wellspring of feeling running rampant in our nation. Sponsored by the American Anthropological Association with generous support from the National Science Foundation and the Ford Foundation, the exhibit was designed to change the way U.S. teachers in middle and high schools thought and talked about race with their students. During the almost 12 years since, the exhibit has circulated around the country, and we have and are continuing to learn about the impact of its content on museums, their staffs and their programming; on visitors, many of whom have been exposed to these ideas about race for the first time; on teachers and schools; and on public policy in the areas of health, wealth accumulation, and politics. My talk will explore those findings and their theoretical and praxis implications for what a Race 2.0 project should look like going forward.

Part 1

Part 2

COMMENTATOR: HARRISON, Faye V. (U Illinois)

COMMENTATOR: THOMAS, Deborah A. (U Penn)

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

10

Anthropology AND Activism

CHAIR: WILLOW, Anna (Ohio State U)

ABSTRACT: This three-part session explores the dynamic relationship between anthropology and activism. Not only is activism a vibrant research topic (1—anthropology OF activism), but scholars increasingly embrace roles as engaged social actors (2—anthropology AS activism), which has compelled reflexive attention to anthropology-activism intersections and their implications (3—anthropology AND activism). What have we learned about activism as a cultural phenomenon? What happens when anthropologists become activists? What unique roles do we play? Panelists address these questions by reflecting on research ethics, methods, and findings in the timely areas of extrACTION/environment, food security, health, and the defense of democracy.

Session Participants:

FITZPATRICK, Brenda (UBC) Ethnography and Conflict Transformation: Promise and Unexpected Dilemmas

SCHULLER, Mark (NIU) Challenges of “Communiversity” Organizing in Trumplandia

CASSADY, C.M. and SANKAR, Andrea (Wayne State U) Educating for Activism and Relevance: Learning through Anthropology and Social Work

SCHENSUL, Stephen (UConn) Empirical Activism in Anthropology

KLINE, Nolan and VICKERS, Mary (Rollins Coll) Trump, Turbulent Times, and Collaboration for Change: Activist Anthropology with Undocumented Latinx Immigrants in Central Florida

DISCUSSANTS: SIMONELLI, Jeanne (Wottsamotta U Consulting), FISKE, Shirley (UMD)

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

11

Applying Anthropology in Education: Addressing Equity from K-College

CHAIRS: PUCCIA, Ellen (Beta Rsch Assoc Inc) and CAMPBELL-MONTALVO, Rebecca (UConn)

ABSTRACT: Students face challenges as they navigate through the U.S. educational system. National culture, institutional context, and local discourses spur inequality and comprise hurdles for students, families, and educators. Anthropologists working in these areas use a variety of research methods to describe factors that affect matriculation of groups. Such studies inform on topics from undergraduates’ persistence in their declared majors to the social and emotional climate children face in elementary school. Applications promise to arm individuals with improved approaches to creating better climates and addressing causes of educational inequality. This panel highlights implications of applied anthropological research in school equity

Session Participants: 

CAMPBELL-MONTALVO, Rebecca (UConn) Ethnography in the Florida Heartland: Applications for Educators to Improve Equity for Minoritized Groups

PUCCIA, Ellen (Beta Rsch Assoc Inc), SMITH, Chrystal A.S., CAMPBELL-MONTALVO, Rebecca, and KERSAINT, Gladis (UConn) How Universities Can Support Women and Underrepresented Minority Engineering Students: Applications of Interviews with Undergraduates

PFISTER, Anne (USF) Photovoice in the Undergraduate Classroom

BARTLE, Shannon (USF) Changing Scales and Scope in World History: Applied Anthropology and Instructional Design for the Changing AP World History Curriculum

WIEDMAN, Dennis (FIU) Directing Organizational Culture Change of a Public University for Inclusion of Indigenous Peoples: The FIU Global Indigenous Forum

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

12

Applied Visual Anthropology

CHAIR: STINNETT, Ashley (WKU)

ABSTRACT: Visual media is one viable way for anthropologists to engage with research participants, community organizations and the public. Over 40 years ago Margaret Mead published a piece calling for the importance of visual data collection in anthropology. Yet, today we still see a gap in the use of readily available audio-visual technology, despite its cultural saturation. This panel addresses a breadth of multimedia methodological possibilities including illustration, photography, audio, video, and immersive environments in practice oriented anthropological settings as a way to cross-pollinate and encourage other scholars to utilize this valuable tool for engagement with stakeholders and communities. 

Session participants: 

HENDRICKSON, Carol (Marlboro Coll) Drawn In: Affective Dimensions of Drawing

HOLST, Joshua (Colorado Coll) Voices of Survivors: Mass Media and the Aural Anthropology of Human Trafficking

FELDMAN, Lindsey (U Memphis) Seeing Humanity: The Role of Visual Anthropology in Prison Research

STINNETT, Ashley (WKU) Virtual Reality and Immersive Environments: Engagements with New Methodological Approaches in Applied Research

GILL, Harjant (Towson U) Making Ethnographic Media for Non-Academic Audiences

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

13

Human Trafficking: Critical Perspectives on U.S. Policy, Practice, and Discourse

CHAIR: JOHNSON, Melissa (USF)

ABSTRACT: Human trafficking is an issue that has gained significant global attention over the last two decades, resulting in the rapid growth of anti-trafficking initiatives. The particular ways in which human trafficking is framed by various stakeholders, including policy-makers, state agencies, advocates, and humanitarian organizations, have important implications for the development of anti-trafficking policy and practice. The papers in this session take a critical approach in examining the particular ideologies underlying anti-trafficking policy, practice, and discourse in the United States, and the implications for those who have experienced or are vulnerable to human trafficking.

Session participants: 

JAMES, Sophie (USF) Unpaid, Emotional Labor: The True Cost of Vulnerability in Trusting AntiTrafficking Advocates

JOHNSON, Melissa Hope (USF) Somewhere between Victim and Agent: Rethinking the Public Narrative on Sexually Exploited Youth

DANLAG, Jaine (USF) Tales of Trafficking: Performing Women’s Narratives in a Sex Trafficking Rehabilitation Program in Florida

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

14

Inclusion on Campus: the Role of Anthropology

CHAIR: GERBER, Elaine (Montclair State U)

ABSTRACT: From professor perspectives and actions about disability, accessibility, and inclusion in university classrooms to student activism and initiatives to advocate for disability rights and expanded services… what is the role of anthropology on college campuses? In these turbulent times, we have seen disabled activists at the forefront of the culture wars, on the frontlines fighting to save health care in the US and as prominent players in the #MeToo movement. This panel examines whether and how that activism extends to college campuses, and the role of anthropology (faculty, departments, students, programs, curricular innovations, etc.) in that process. 

Session participants:

GERBER, Elaine (Montclair State U) The Campus Access Project: Generating Activism and Improving Access through Classroom Assignments

KONECZNY, Nell (UIC) Activism and Research: Anthropological Perspectives on Professor Engagement with Disability, Accessibility, and Inclusion

ACEVEDO, Sara (Bellevue Coll) Naming Silences: Reclaiming Disability Narratives through Curricular Intervention

OLSON, Krisjon (MCW) Propositions for Anthropology in Medical Education: Introducing Structural Competence into the Diversity and Inclusion Initiative on a Midwestern Campus

ROSCIGNO, Robin (Rutgers U) Establishing “Rhetoricity”: Knowledge Production among Autistic Students in a College Support System

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

15

Engaging the Traditional Practice of Navajo Peacemaking into Present-day Education to Address the Historical Turbulence of Colonization

CHAIR: MARTINEZ, Clara (Naco Rsch Inst)

ABSTRACT: This panel describes practices of traditional Navajo Peacemaking implemented in schools on and off the Reservation, engaging culturally relevant curricula and methodology to address modern and historical barriers to Native American student achievement. Historically, Indian Education in the US has been utilized as an assimilationist methodology of colonization. Failures-failure over time has evolved pedagogical practice toward that which is known to succeed—educational self-determination. The authors describe social and academic results from different locations within public school districts on and off the Reservation in SE Utah and Northern Arizona. 

Session participants: 

MARTINEZ, Clara (Naco Rsch Inst) US Office of Indian Education and Native American Educational Self-Determination

SORENSEN, Mark (Star School) Indigenizing Schools through Navajo Peacemaking

STANLEY, Chester (Navajo Nation) Traditional Navajo Peacemaking in a Public School District

SHIRLEY, Danielle (San Juan School District) Native Youth Advocacy in a Public School District

OLSEN, Trevor (San Juan School District) Native Youth Community Project in a Public School District in SE Utah

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

16

SfAA Awards Ceremony

CONVENER: Dr. Sherylyn Briller 

Sol Tax Distinguished Service Award RecipientDr. Roberto Alvarez, University of California, San Diego
Margaret Mead Award Recipient: Dr. Jennifer Mack of the KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Bronislaw Malinowski Award Recipient: Dr. Spero Manson, University of Colorado School of Public Health

Part 1: 2019 Award Ceremony Introduction

Part 2: Sol Tax Award

Part 3: Margaret Mead Award

Part 4: Bronislaw Malinowski Award

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

17

Indigenous Voices in Parks and Protected Areas: Applied Ethnography from the American Southwest to Central Australia

CHAIR: STOFFLE, Richard (U Arizona)

ABSTRACT: Indigenous peoples are reaffirming their connections with traditional lands and resources through formal consultations within government agencies. To this end, they have collaborated with applied anthropologists to conduct ethnographic studies that have informed governance and decision-making by land managers and tribal governments. This session showcases a range of ethnographic studies in National Parks and National Monuments in the Southwest— Arches National Park, Canyonlands National Park, and Hovenweep National Monument—conducted by our University of Arizona (UofA) research team. One panelist offers a comparative perspective from central Australia, based on work as an applied anthropologist on cultural and natural resource management projects undertaken by Indigenous governments. This panel documents how studies have influenced how the NPS and Government agencies understand cultural resources, publicly interpret them, and utilize these insights in park management.

Session participants: 

SITTLER, Christopher (U Arizona) Interpreting Interpretations: Native Voices in Public Displays

STOFFLE, Richard (U Arizona): Stone Arches as GeoFacts in Utah National Parks: Epistemological Divides in Environmental Communication

VAN VLACK, Kathleen (Living Heritage Rsch Council) Sky Watchers: Indigenous Astronomy in Two National Parks

KAYS, Cameron (U Arizona) American Indian Traditional Spring Cleanings

PENRY, Grace (U Arizona) The Identification of the Shinny Stick and Its Significance for Native American Women

ALBERTIE, Mariah (U Arizona) Aztec Butte Sacred Or Profane

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

18

Re-thinking Subsistence in Turbulent Times: New Contexts, Configurations, and Intersections with Social and Environmental Justice

CHAIRS: CLAY, Patricia (NOAA Fisheries)

ABSTRACT: Subsistence has long been recognized as a cultural system among indigenous peoples—a way of harvesting, sharing resources, and maintaining social traditions. While pioneered and formalized in the US with respect to Alaska Natives, there has been a 10-year proliferation of research on non-indigenous communities practicing subsistence in nontraditional contexts (including coastal Louisiana, Northeast coastal fishing, and fishing in urban rivers and parks). This panel brings together research and work from recent studies to encourage re-thinking subsistence given contemporary realities. The papers investigate the intersection of subsistence harvesting and social and environmental justice. 

Session Participants: 

FISKE, Shirley (UMD) “Fishing for Food”: Subsistence Fishing in Urban Rivers and Environmental Justice

CALLAWAY, Donald (NPS, retired) Food Insecurity among “Subsistence” Anglers in the D.C. Area

POE, Melissa (UW Sea Grant & NOAA) Sustaining the Subsistence Value and Cultural Seafood Practices Associated with Commercial Fisheries of the United States West Coast

EBBIN, Syma (UConn) Fishing for Meaning: Probing Competing Perceptions of Food Fish and Fisheries

DISCUSSANT: LUTON, Harry (BOEM)

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

19

Designs for Applied Anthropology

CHAIR: FISHER, Josh (WWU)

ABSTRACT: Design has long occupied anthropological practice. From research to writing and teaching to intervention, design is the bridge between matter and form, vision and reality. The term calls to mind the creative capacity of human beings to build and negotiate the diverse worlds. This panel belongs to the special track, “Designs for Turbulent Times,” that seeks to rethink the application of anthropology as less concerned with producing forms and things for the world as it is, and more with engaging worlds and world-making practices that may come to be. Topics include: development, the commons, pedagogy, activism, and “applied” anthropology.

Session participants: 

ZHANG, Shaozeng (OR State U) Participatory Design of “Smart Forest” in the Brazilian Amazon Using Smart Phones, Apps, Algorithms and Ethnographic Methods

KIESSLING, Brittany and MAXWELL, Keely (EPA) Designing an Applied Anthropology for Government Institutions

RIOS, Jodi (UC Davis) Undisciplining Research: The Opportunities and Limitations of a DesignThinking Approach

FISHER, Josh (WWU) and NADING, Alex (Brown U) Designs for Buen Vivir: Toward a Cohort-Model of Participatory Research

DISCUSSANT: ESCOBAR, Arturo (UNCCH)

Q&A

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

20

Designs for Teaching Other Worlds

CHAIRS: LYON-CALLO, Vincent (W Michigan U) and SHEAR, Boone (UMass)

ABSTRACT: Design has long occupied anthropological practice. From research to writing and teaching to intervention, design is the bridge between matter and form, vision and reality. The term calls to mind the creative capacity of human beings to build and negotiate the diverse worlds. This panel belongs to the special track, “Designs for Turbulent Times,” that seeks to rethink the application of anthropology as less concerned with producing forms and things for the world as it is, and more with engaging worlds and world-making practices that may come to be. Topics include: development, the commons, pedagogy, activism, and “applied” anthropology. 

Listeners please be advised, the presentation "Despair, Desires, Distraught Students, and Design for Imagining/Enacting a Possible World" discusses suicide and self-harm of students. 

Session participants: 

SHEAR, Boone (UMass) Indeterminacy and Networked Mess as a Design for Teaching Other Worlds

KAWA, Nick, LIPSCHITZ, Forbes, and RANCE, Logan (Ohio State U) Collaborative Design for Teaching about the Use of Human “Waste” as an Agricultural Resource in the American Midwest 

LYON-CALLO, Vincent (W Michigan U) Despair, Desires, Distraught Students, and Design for Imagining/Enacting a Possible World

Please note that the following audio discusses self-harm and suicide among students, which may be distressing to some listeners. If you or someone you know is experiencing thoughts of suicide, please reach out or encourage them to seek help. The National Suicide Prevention Hotline is available 24 hours a day at 1-800-273-8255. 

HEALY, Stephen (W Sydney U) Diverse Economies, Design-Futures and Unmaking Unsustainability 

Session took place in 2019 in Portland, Oregon, at the 79th Annual Meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology

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